Archeology

Archeology

US envoys lend a hand as Israel digs down in east Jerusalem

US envoys wielded hammers on Sunday to break open a new tunnel at a Jewish heritage site in east Jerusalem, signaling Washington’s support for Israel’s hold over parts of the city that Palestinians seek for a future state.

US Ambassador to Israel David Friedman attended the event along with three other visiting American ambassadors as well as US…

Archeology

Building projects at entrance to Jerusalem means real growth (and some growing pains)

(June 25, 2019 / JNS) Just like “Rome wasn’t built in a day,” neither was Jerusalem, says Deputy Mayor of Jerusalem Fleur Hassan-Nahoum.

As a part of the city’s development endeavors, Jerusalem’s main entrance will undergo a grand makeover—a million-square-meter project including construction of a new entryway into the city, extension of the…

Archeology

Ancient observation tower discovered in present IDF paratrooper base

An ancient observation tower was discovered in southern Israel on Wednesday in an IDF paratrooper base. The tower dates back to the days of the King Hezekiah, who ruled the Kingdom of Judah almost 3,000 years ago, according to the Bible.

“The strategic location of the tower served as a lookout and warning point against the Philistine enemy, one…

Archeology

Temple Mount Sifting Project reboots, aims to salvage ancient temple artifacts

Minister of Jerusalem Affairs and Heritage Zeev Elkin played show and tell at the June 2 Cabinet meeting this week. To mark Jerusalem Day, a national holiday celebrating the 1967 reunification of Jerusalem, Elkin brought to the Prime Minister’s Office a rare 2,700-year-old First Temple clay sealing impression, fittingly inscribed with the name of…

Archeology

Archaeologists discover city gate from time of King David

After nearly 32 years of excavation in the ancient city of Bethsaida in the Golan Heights’ Jordan Park northeast of the Sea of Galilee, a city gate from the time of King David was discovered – opening up a world of new possibilities, opinions and theories about the ancient landscape of the Land of Israel.

According to the chief archaeologist…

Archeology

Israeli scientists find evidence of humans ‘recycling’ 400,000 years ago

A new Tel Aviv University study found that there is evidence that 400,000 years ago, prehistoric humans “recycled” their broken flint, the researchers announced on Wednesday. They transformed their discarded flint tools to make smaller utensils with specific functions.

Recycling was a way of life for these people,” said Prof. Ran Barkai, one of…

Archeology

Germany to return papers of Kafka’s friend Max Brod to Israel

BERLIN, Germany (AFP) — German police on Tuesday will hand over to Israel thousands of stolen papers and manuscripts belonging to Max Brod, the friend and literary executor of Czech writer Franz Kafka.

Brod, who died in Tel Aviv in 1968, is primarily responsible for Kafka’s success as one of the 20th century’s most influential writers, having…

Archeology

9 rare photos from Israel’s War of Independence

Thursday is Israel’s Independence Day, which commemorates the country’s official Declaration of Independence in 1948. The country celebrated with rallies, fireworks displays, flyovers by the Israeli Air Force and family barbecues.

It was a hard-fought independence — the day after the declaration, a coalition of Arab armies attacked and started…

Archeology

Postcard discovered of David Ben-Gurion writing, ‘State of Israel has been born!’

A postcard written and signed by Israel’s first prime minister, David Ben-Gurion, just one day after officially declaring the State of Israel’s independence, was recently discovered. Dated on the sixth day of the Hebrew month of Iyar in the Jewish year 5748 (May 15, 1948), it was sent to the founding father of the kibbutz movement, Shlomo Lavi.

Archeology

High-tech study of ancient stone suggests new proof of King David’s dynasty

Since the early 1990s, scholars have pointed to a barely readable bit of text on a nearly 3,000-year-old stone as possibly the first extra-biblical historical proof of the Davidic Monarchy. The reading, based upon decades of educated guesses, is notable for what can’t be fully discerned in the Moabite script almost as much as what can.

A pair of…

Archeology

Archaeologist: Thick wall found at Lachish indicates King Solomon’s son built it

An archaeologist has recently uncovered a fortified wall in the ancient city of Lachish, a discovery he said shores up the biblical account of the site and suggests that a centralized kingdom ruled by King David and his descendants was founded and expanded earlier than previously believed.

Prof. Yosef Garfinkel, head of the Hebrew University of…

Archeology

Tiny First Temple find could be first proof of aide to biblical King Josiah

Two minuscule 2,600-year-old inscriptions recently uncovered in the City of David’s Givati Parking Lot excavation are vastly enlarging the understanding of ancient Jerusalem in the late 8th century BCE.

The two inscriptions, in paleo-Hebrew writing, were found separately in a large First Temple structure within the span of a few weeks by…

Archeology

5th century Greek inscription found at site of ancient Samaritan rebellion

A salvage excavation ahead of the construction of a new neighborhood in the central Israel village of Tzur Natan has unearthed rare written evidence of much earlier occupation — 1,600 years earlier — when the agriculturally fertile area was racked by turmoil and rebellion.

Just outside an ancient wine press in the small southern Sharon Plain…

Archeology

Kid on school trip unearths Second Temple-era coin in West Bank stream

A boy found a 2,000-year-old coin from the Second Temple-era rule of Herod Agrippa, the last king of Judea, during a hike last week in the northern West Bank.

The rare piece was uncovered in the Shilo stream during a school trip, according to a Sunday statement from the Coordinator of Government Activities in the Territories (COGAT), an Israeli…

Archeology

0:32 / 4:55 The Watchman’s Top Biblical Archaeology / History Segments of 2018

Archeology

Biblical site tied to Ark of the Covenant unearthed at convent in central Israel

A massive 8th century BCE man-made platform discovered at a Catholic convent in central Israel may have served as an ancient shrine to the Ark of the Covenant, said leading Tel Aviv University archaeologist Israel Finkelstein. Unearthed at Kiriath-Jearim, the shrine gives potential new insight into the political machinations of the sibling…

Archeology

Israel’s Jesus Trail blends religion, history and stunning views

Imagine going on a hike and being able to step back in time, visiting places you’d only read about. It’s an itinerary ripped not from a history book – but from the Bible. The “Jesus Trail,” a hiking trail in Israel, attracts thousands of tourists from around the world every year, especially during the holiday season. CBS News correspondent Seth…

Archeology

Earliest known stone carving of Hebrew word ‘Jerusalem’ found near city entrance

The earliest stone inscription bearing the full spelling of the modern Hebrew word for Jerusalem was unveiled on Tuesday at the Israel Museum, in the capital.

While any inscription dating from the Second Temple period is of note, the 2,000-year-old three-line inscription on a waist-high column — reading “Hananiah son of Dodalos of Jerusalem” — is…